New Cat Traps!

New Cat Traps!

WICC has purchased 4 new cage traps for feral cat control on the Nullaki, partially funded by donations received through the WICC website. The cages are from a premiere WA manufacturer, feature smooth operation and sturdy construction, and are hot-dip galvanised for years of service. They are treadle-actuated, which means they are easily baited, and the smallest cat tippy-toe will trigger the trap door. The traps will be used by NCI members at various locations, and will also be available to borrow by Nullaki residents. We will deliver the trap, give advice about locating, baiting and setting the trap, and...

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Cockies at their Local

Cockies at their Local

Watering hole, that is. This mob of Carnaby’s Cockatoos have made a big splash at the birdbath lately! Arriving en masse twice a day, they travel out to the Nullaki in the morning and return to their “mainland” roosts in the late afternoon. They always make room for another drinker, while the little peppermint saplings sag under the weight of the big birds waiting in the queue.  It’s a reminder that providing fresh water for wildlife doesn’t go unnoticed, by the big birds, the little birds, the bees, and the occasional athletic dugite!

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A Marsupial Tale (tail?)

A Marsupial Tale (tail?)

While running down a private road off Nullaki Drive a few weeks ago, I picked up the object in the attached photos. There was only one thing I thought it could be, and I sent the photos out to 4 ecologists who all came back with the same ID confirming my suspicion: it’s the tip of the tail of a brush-tailed phascogale! (link to previous article on NCI website: https://nullakiconservation.org/2018/09/17/whos-that-up-in-the-tree/). Obviously the poor little guy is dead, but the news is still good. Well, not for him. But phascogales on the Nullaki is a big deal! In 2018 we put...

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Nullaki Monitoring Plan

Nullaki Monitoring Plan

How many foxes do we have roaming the Nullaki? Are the feral cats widespread, or confined to certain areas? Do we have bandicoots wandering around at night? Are the rabbits really worse than in previous years? To answer these and other questions, WICC and Nullaki Conservation Initiative have implemented a plan to provide a consistent methodology for monitoring native and feral fauna on the Nullaki. The plan is also a requirement of grants we have received to carry out our sustainable biodiversity efforts. The tools of the plan are technical (camera traps and computer analysis), and human (WICC staff, NCI...

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New NCI Sign!

New NCI Sign!

We are proud to unveil our new sign on the Nullaki gate, depicting the peninsula in images and maps, and describing our activities aimed at maintaining and enhancing the biodiversity of this special place. Thanks to our parent organisation WICC for the funding, and to WICC’s hotshot graphic designer Corrina Ossinger for creating this fresh look for NCI. Contact information for both NCI and WICC are located at the bottom, in case you have a question, or want to get involved! Plenty of opportunities to pull invasive weeds, host trail cameras or cat traps, and participate in baiting for foxes....

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Save the Seal?

Save the Seal?

A New Zealand fur seal is discovered ‘washed up’ on the Anvil Beach sand. He is lying very still, his breathing almost imperceptible. His fur seems dried out, not sleek and wet like we are used to seeing. He has a wound on his shoulder, which looks old and healed. He doesn’t appear to see or hear the approaching people, then strains to lift his head and lets out a low growl, and lays his head back down. What do we do? Who do we call? How do we help him? The Wildcare Helpline, (08) 9474 9055, https://www.dpaw.wa.gov.au/about-us/contact-us/wildcare-helpline, is run...

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Arum Lily – wicked beauty

Arum Lily – wicked beauty

Arum Lily, Zantedeschia aethiopica, was introduced to WA from South Africa more than 100 years ago as a garden plant. It is now a widespread and well-established weed, and the sale or propagation of this declared pest has been prohibited since 2006. It thrives in the moist conditions of the Southwest, where it chokes out native vegetation and invades pastures. Contact with Arum Lily can cause eczema in humans, and ingestion is toxic to animals, with stock losses documented. It spreads by growth of underground tubers, and by seed dispersal via birds. TIP: In WA, landowners are required to control...

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